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As Our Country Progresses, We Become More Secular.
Study after study document one glimmer of hope for the United States: As our country progresses, we become more secular.  Not only has the United States become more secular over time, but where religion is expressed, it is expressed more liberally and less dogmatically. In a nation where the fastest growing religious group includes atheists, agnostics, and the non-religious, the religious experiences that many have are becoming more personal: Where religion is concerned, they are “doing their own thing,” and not playing by ancient rulebooks. While that idea has its own set of problems, it can leave naturalists hopeful that the ethical guidelines our religious countrymen are constructing are based more in reality and less in ancient, arbitrary books.
In the Southern region, we’ve seen political attack ads against candidates for political office accusing one candidate in Alabama of–horror of horrors!–not believing that the entire Bible is true and once stating that evolution best explains the origin of our species (despite his objections and solemn oath that he believes the entire Bible and not evolution, he lost the race). The winner of that race, Governor Bentley, then made a statement early in his term that people who were not Christians were not “his brothers and sisters.” In Mississippi and Alabama, residents are urging atheists to “go back to Wisconsin” after the Freedom From Religion Foundation complained that public schools were inappropriately leading children in prayer. Mississippians followed this up by introducing legislation to recognize that a person becomes a legal person “at the moment of conception,” a move which would likely outlaw abortion along with birth control. (I wonder if it will apply to the U.S.-conceived zygotes of illegal immigrants).

As Our Country Progresses, We Become More Secular.

Study after study document one glimmer of hope for the United States: As our country progresses, we become more secular.  Not only has the United States become more secular over time, but where religion is expressed, it is expressed more liberally and less dogmatically. In a nation where the fastest growing religious group includes atheists, agnostics, and the non-religious, the religious experiences that many have are becoming more personal: Where religion is concerned, they are “doing their own thing,” and not playing by ancient rulebooks. While that idea has its own set of problems, it can leave naturalists hopeful that the ethical guidelines our religious countrymen are constructing are based more in reality and less in ancient, arbitrary books.

In the Southern region, we’ve seen political attack ads against candidates for political office accusing one candidate in Alabama of–horror of horrors!–not believing that the entire Bible is true and once stating that evolution best explains the origin of our species (despite his objections and solemn oath that he believes the entire Bible and not evolution, he lost the race). The winner of that race, Governor Bentley, then made a statement early in his term that people who were not Christians were not “his brothers and sisters.” In Mississippi and Alabama, residents are urging atheists to “go back to Wisconsin” after the Freedom From Religion Foundation complained that public schools were inappropriately leading children in prayer. Mississippians followed this up by introducing legislation to recognize that a person becomes a legal person “at the moment of conception,” a move which would likely outlaw abortion along with birth control. (I wonder if it will apply to the U.S.-conceived zygotes of illegal immigrants).

Filed under secular atheist progressr eligion politics