Freenet or die

If more people would participate. They can use the Internet.

Posts tagged profit

294 notes

america-wakiewakie:

Photo Essay Reveals The Explosive Growth Of California’s Prison System CALIFORNIA LEADS THE NATION IN NEW PRISONS | Fast Codesign 

But it’s hard to comprehend the scope of the system until you’ve seen it. 

…[W]e should be paying more attention to the way state governments are expanding (and profiting from) the prison-industrial complex. “I wanted to provide a visual dimension to a conversation that often traffics in numbers and acronyms,” he explains. He plans to add more facilities to the list, and hopes people will embed PrisonCount on their own sites.

[Photo Credit: Sebastian Knight/Shutterstock]

(via occupyv)

Filed under prison industrial complexe prison privatize law greed profit fascism corporate rape

2 notes

That spilled coal-washing chemical is still showing up in drinking water of West Virginia schools
A chemical Freedom Industries spilled at least 10,000 gallons of into the supplies of drinking water to nine West Virginia counties a month ago is still being found in water piped into some schools there. Mackenzie Mays of the Charleston Gazette reported Thursday on the latest situation. On Wednesday, a Riverside High School teacher, who had fainted, and a student were transported to the hospital. Many students complained of lightheadedness and burning eyes and noses:
Now, some schools in Kanawha County are being forced to close again because the black-licorice odor associated with the Crude MCHM coal-cleaning chemical is returning, and there are reports of fainting and other side effects while faucets are running—posing questions about the potential dangers of inhaling the water’s fumes, as well.
Three Kanawha County schools abruptly closed Thursday after school staff members reported that they’d smelled the odor, and cooks complained of burning eyes and nausea. The incidents mirrored problems at two Belle-area schools on Wednesday, which also were forced to dismiss students early.

That spilled coal-washing chemical is still showing up in drinking water of West Virginia schools

A chemical Freedom Industries spilled at least 10,000 gallons of into the supplies of drinking water to nine West Virginia counties a month ago is still being found in water piped into some schools there. Mackenzie Mays of the Charleston Gazette reported Thursday on the latest situation. On Wednesday, a Riverside High School teacher, who had fainted, and a student were transported to the hospital. Many students complained of lightheadedness and burning eyes and noses:

Now, some schools in Kanawha County are being forced to close again because the black-licorice odor associated with the Crude MCHM coal-cleaning chemical is returning, and there are reports of fainting and other side effects while faucets are running—posing questions about the potential dangers of inhaling the water’s fumes, as well.

Three Kanawha County schools abruptly closed Thursday after school staff members reported that they’d smelled the odor, and cooks complained of burning eyes and nausea. The incidents mirrored problems at two Belle-area schools on Wednesday, which also were forced to dismiss students early.

Filed under coal frack pollution profit dirty energy environment health alternatives green

0 notes

Against The Will of The People: NRA, One More Corporate Lobby Promoting Profit Over Life in Spite of What Americans Want

The Problem

There is an epidemic of gun violence in the US. To put it in perspective, England reports 45 gun homicides per year. England’s culture is similar to ours— they hunt, collect guns, value marksmanship; they have gangs, drugs and poverty. Our population is 5 times England’s, 300 million vs. 60 million.
 
If we had England’s gun laws, which are based on public safety, we could expect 5 times their gun homicides or 225 gun homicides per year.

We have 10,000, over 4,300% more.

Why?

Because American gun laws are based on maximizing sales for the gun industry, not public safety.
As a result, our gun laws are not sane.
 

Filed under guns 4th nra gun lobby profit death

0 notes

Excessive Sentencing by the Mentally Disturbed Whores in Office: The United States of Fucking Shit

Serving Life Without Parole for Nonviolent Crimes

A shocking new study by the American Civil Liberties Union has found that more than 3,200 people nationwide are serving life terms without parole for nonviolent offenses. Of those prisoners, 80 percent are behind bars for drug-related convictions. Sixty-five percent are African-American, 18 percent are white, and 16 percent are Latino — evidence of what the ACLU calls “extreme racial disparities.” The crimes that led to life sentences include stealing gas from a truck, shoplifting, possessing a crack pipe, facilitating a $10 sale of marijuana, and attempting to cash a stolen check. We speak with Jennifer Turner, human rights researcher and author of the new ACLU report, “A Living Death: Life Without Parole for Nonviolent Offenses.”

"Prisoners of Profit": Despite Widespread Abuse, Private Juvenile Jail Firm Expands Empire

We look at a major new investigation into how Youth Services International, a private prison company that runs juvenile detention centers, is rapidly expanding its services, despite a record of abuse and neglect over the past 25 years. Despite allegations that include the neglect and abuse of young prisoners and the bribing of public officials to win contracts, Youth Services International has expanded its contracts to operate juvenile prisons in several states.

"From a glance at his background, one might assume that James F. Slattery would have a difficult time convincing any state in America to entrust him with the supervision of its lawbreaking youth.

"Over the past quarter century, Slattery’s for-profit prison enterprises have run afoul of the Justice Department and authorities in New York, Florida, Maryland, Nevada and Texas for alleged offenses ranging from condoning abuse of inmates to plying politicians with undisclosed gifts while seeking to secure state contracts."

Kirkham goes on to write, quote, “In 2001, an 18-year-old committed to a Texas boot camp operated by one of Slattery’s previous companies, Correctional Services Corp., came down with pneumonia and pleaded to see a doctor as he struggled to breathe. Guards accused the teen of faking it and forced him to do pushups in his own vomit, according to Texas law enforcement reports. After nine days of medical neglect, he died.

…just like America

Filed under cattle profit greed soul

28 notes

environmentalillnessnetwork:

This Robyn O’Brien quotation is from her Prevention article: “The Food Bailout: How Our Taxes Are Funding a Broken Food System.”
She explained:

If you are one of the countless Americans who has ever stopped to wonder why fresh fruit is so expensive and processed and packaged food is so cheap, it’s largely because of the “Farm Bill” and the way that we currently allocate our taxpayer resources in our national food budget.
How it stands right now is that as taxpayers, we are writing checks and that money is being used as taxpayer funded payments called “subsidies” to support the growing of corn and soy, crops used to make our processed foods. Few of the dollars that we send in are used to support other foods in any meaningful way.  In other words, our current system keeps the foods that use these ingredients, mainly the cheap processed foods, cheap, while making everything else seem expensive.
Can you imagine if instead of funding the junk food, we funded other foods?  Like apples and carrots for example?

Comment: The corn, soy, and sugar beet crops that are subsidized directly or indirectly by U.S. taxpayers are largely Monsanto’s GMO crops. Monsanto and some other unscrupulous corporations spend A LOT of money “influencing” politicians in order to get health-undermining GMO/junk food supporting subsidies/policies passed into law.
So long as functional corruption is legal in the U.S., it is hard to imagine our health, human rights, economy, climate, democracy, and tax dollars will be safe. There is very little that is going wrong in the U.S. that less corruption couldn’t help cure.

environmentalillnessnetwork:

This Robyn O’Brien quotation is from her Prevention article: “The Food Bailout: How Our Taxes Are Funding a Broken Food System.”

She explained:

If you are one of the countless Americans who has ever stopped to wonder why fresh fruit is so expensive and processed and packaged food is so cheap, it’s largely because of the “Farm Bill” and the way that we currently allocate our taxpayer resources in our national food budget.

How it stands right now is that as taxpayers, we are writing checks and that money is being used as taxpayer funded payments called “subsidies” to support the growing of corn and soy, crops used to make our processed foods. Few of the dollars that we send in are used to support other foods in any meaningful way.  In other words, our current system keeps the foods that use these ingredients, mainly the cheap processed foods, cheap, while making everything else seem expensive.

Can you imagine if instead of funding the junk food, we funded other foods?  Like apples and carrots for example?

Comment: The corn, soy, and sugar beet crops that are subsidized directly or indirectly by U.S. taxpayers are largely Monsanto’s GMO crops. Monsanto and some other unscrupulous corporations spend A LOT of money “influencing” politicians in order to get health-undermining GMO/junk food supporting subsidies/policies passed into law.

So long as functional corruption is legal in the U.S., it is hard to imagine our health, human rights, economy, climate, democracy, and tax dollars will be safe. There is very little that is going wrong in the U.S. that less corruption couldn’t help cure.

Filed under farm bill gmo food health profit fascism corporate rape

2 notes

Racist Indifferent Obese White Folk Stampede Outside of Paula Deen’s Heartattack Hog Trough, Slobbering Frenetically for a Chance to Feed
Paula says, “I love neegra’s, everyone should own one…whoops…sorry…”
Have a krispy kreme dough-nut dipped in mayonnaise; it will cure everything but racism and obesity.

Racist Indifferent Obese White Folk Stampede Outside of Paula Deen’s Heartattack Hog Trough, Slobbering Frenetically for a Chance to Feed

Paula says, “I love neegra’s, everyone should own one…whoops…sorry…”

Have a krispy kreme dough-nut dipped in mayonnaise; it will cure everything but racism and obesity.

Filed under pig out fuck you paula obesity food racism profit whore

0 notes

Private Prisons Screwing America
I Crossed the Boarder and I Got Jailed by a Private Prison Corporation where Americans pay the for profit company that holds me $600 a day and since the law requires I have access to health care while incarcerated Americans also pay for my medial expenses….instead of earning minimum wage while working a shit job and taking care of my own rent. And most illegals like me come from rural Mexico, where our agriculture cannot compete with American or Canadian prices. Thanks to NAFTA I can only survive by coming to America and thanks to CCA many Americans make a very few American thieves very wealthy.
Gringos Son Muy Tontos

Private Prisons Screwing America

I Crossed the Boarder and I Got Jailed by a Private Prison Corporation where Americans pay the for profit company that holds me $600 a day and since the law requires I have access to health care while incarcerated Americans also pay for my medial expenses….instead of earning minimum wage while working a shit job and taking care of my own rent. And most illegals like me come from rural Mexico, where our agriculture cannot compete with American or Canadian prices. Thanks to NAFTA I can only survive by coming to America and thanks to CCA many Americans make a very few American thieves very wealthy.

Gringos Son Muy Tontos

Filed under cca private prisons privatize immigration mexico profit

101 notes

quickhits:

demnewswire:

The NRA and Gun Companies Stand to Profit From Newtown Tragedy
From Alaska to Florida, gun sales across the country are going through the roof, with thousands buying up ammunition, high-powered semiautomatic rifles and other weaponry out of concern that the federal government will enact new regulations on gun ownership. In Tennessee, officials say gun purchases likely hit an all-time high. Walmart has reportedly run out of semiautomatic rifles in five states.
And though the NRA has been roundly mocked for its public relations effort this week, officials are watching what is sure to be a flood of new cash.
Here’s why: For every gun or package of ammunition sold at participating stores, a dollar is donated to the NRA. The NRA’s corporate fundraising division has several special retail partnerships called “Add-A-Buck,” “NRA Round-Up,” and “Shooting for the Future.” In some cases, these deals allow for customers to contribute a dollar or two to the NRA at the point of purchase; others, like one with Sturm, Ruger & Co., the company led by Mike Fifer, require automatic contributions to the NRA with every purchase. Many of these retail deals are linked to the NRA’s 501(c)4 affiliate, which can, unlike other affiliates of the NRA, spend that money on political advertisements and lobbying.
The Nation

Literally blood money.

NRA Makes Money When American Children Are Murdered And American Corporations Make Money When Children Are Droned

quickhits:

demnewswire:

The NRA and Gun Companies Stand to Profit From Newtown Tragedy

From Alaska to Florida, gun sales across the country are going through the roof, with thousands buying up ammunition, high-powered semiautomatic rifles and other weaponry out of concern that the federal government will enact new regulations on gun ownership. In Tennessee, officials say gun purchases likely hit an all-time high. Walmart has reportedly run out of semiautomatic rifles in five states.

And though the NRA has been roundly mocked for its public relations effort this week, officials are watching what is sure to be a flood of new cash.

Here’s why: For every gun or package of ammunition sold at participating stores, a dollar is donated to the NRA. The NRA’s corporate fundraising division has several special retail partnerships called “Add-A-Buck,” “NRA Round-Up,” and “Shooting for the Future.” In some cases, these deals allow for customers to contribute a dollar or two to the NRA at the point of purchase; others, like one with Sturm, Ruger & Co., the company led by Mike Fifer, require automatic contributions to the NRA with every purchase. Many of these retail deals are linked to the NRA’s 501(c)4 affiliate, which can, unlike other affiliates of the NRA, spend that money on political advertisements and lobbying.

The Nation

Literally blood money.

NRA Makes Money When American Children Are Murdered And American Corporations Make Money When Children Are Droned

(via pieceinthepuzzlehumanity-deacti)

Filed under NRA murder profit

521 notes

Prisons do not disappear problems, they disappear human beings. And the practice of disappearing vast numbers of people from poor, immigrant, and racially marginalized communities has literally become big business.

pieceinthepuzzlehumanity:

Masked Racism: Reflections on the Prison Industrial Complex | Angela Y. Davis

sinidentidades:

September 10, 1998

What is the Prison Industrial Complex? Why does it matter?  Angela Y. Davis tells us.

Imprisonment has become the response of first resort to far too many of the social problems that burden people who are ensconced in poverty. These problems often are veiled by being conveniently grouped together under the category “crime” and by the automatic attribution of criminal behavior to people of color. Homelessness, unemployment, drug addiction, mental illness, and illiteracy are only a few of the problems that disappear from public view when the human beings contending with them are relegated to cages.

Prisons thus perform a feat of magic. Or rather the people who continually vote in new prison bonds and tacitly assent to a proliferating network of prisons and jails have been tricked into believing in the magic of imprisonment. But prisons do not disappear problems, they disappear human beings. And the practice of disappearing vast numbers of people from poor, immigrant, and racially marginalized communities has literally become big business.

The seeming effortlessness of magic always conceals an enormous amount of behind-the-scenes work. When prisons disappear human beings in order to convey the illusion of solving social problems, penal infrastructures must be created to accommodate a rapidly swelling population of caged people. Goods and services must be provided to keep imprisoned populations alive. Sometimes these populations must be kept busy and at other times — particularly in repressive super-maximum prisons and in INS detention centers — they must be deprived of virtually all meaningful activity. Vast numbers of handcuffed and shackled people are moved across state borders as they are transferred from one state or federal prison to another.

All this work, which used to be the primary province of government, is now also performed by private corporations, whose links to government in the field of what is euphemistically called “corrections” resonate dangerously with the military industrial complex. The dividends that accrue from investment in the punishment industry, like those that accrue from investment in weapons production, only amount to social destruction. Taking into account the structural similarities and profitability of business-government linkages in the realms of military production and public punishment, the expanding penal system can now be characterized as a “prison industrial complex.”

The Color of Imprisonment

Almost two million people are currently locked up in the immense network of U.S. prisons and jails. More than 70 percent of the imprisoned population are people of color. It is rarely acknowledged that the fastest growing group of prisoners are black women and that Native American prisoners are the largest group per capita. Approximately five million people — including those on probation and parole — are directly under the surveillance of the criminal justice system.

Three decades ago, the imprisoned population was approximately one-eighth its current size. While women still constitute a relatively small percentage of people behind bars, today the number of incarcerated women in California alone is almost twice what the nationwide women’s prison population was in 1970. According to Elliott Currie, “[t]he prison has become a looming presence in our society to an extent unparalleled in our history — or that of any other industrial democracy. Short of major wars, mass incarceration has been the most thoroughly implemented government social program of our time.” 

To deliver up bodies destined for profitable punishment, the political economy of prisons relies on racialized assumptions of criminality — such as images of black welfare mothers reproducing criminal children — and on racist practices in arrest, conviction, and sentencing patterns. Colored bodies constitute the main human raw material in this vast experiment to disappear the major social problems of our time. Once the aura of magic is stripped away from the imprisonment solution, what is revealed is racism, class bias, and the parasitic seduction of capitalist profit. The prison industrial system materially and morally impoverishes its inhabitants and devours the social wealth needed to address the very problems that have led to spiraling numbers of prisoners.

As prisons take up more and more space on the social landscape, other government programs that have previously sought to respond to social needs — such as Temporary Assistance to Needy Families — are being squeezed out of existence. The deterioration of public education, including prioritizing discipline and security over learning in public schools located in poor communities, is directly related to the prison “solution.”

Profiting from Prisoners

As prisons proliferate in U.S. society, private capital has become enmeshed in the punishment industry. And precisely because of their profit potential, prisons are becoming increasingly important to the U.S. economy. If the notion of punishment as a source of potentially stupendous profits is disturbing by itself, then the strategic dependence on racist structures and ideologies to render mass punishment palatable and profitable is even more troubling.

Prison privatization is the most obvious instance of capital’s current movement toward the prison industry. While government-run prisons are often in gross violation of international human rights standards, private prisons are even less accountable. In March of this year, the Corrections Corporation of America (CCA), the largest U.S. private prison company, claimed 54,944 beds in 68 facilities under contract or development in the U.S., Puerto Rico, the United Kingdom, and Australia. Following the global trend of subjecting more women to public punishment, CCA recently opened a women’s prison outside Melbourne. The company recently identified California as its “new frontier.”

Wackenhut Corrections Corporation (WCC), the second largest U.S. prison company, claimed contracts and awards to manage 46 facilities in North America, U.K., and Australia. It boasts a total of 30,424 beds as well as contracts for prisoner health care services, transportation, and security.

Currently, the stocks of both CCA and WCC are doing extremely well. Between 1996 and 1997, CCA’s revenues increased by 58 percent, from $293 million to $462 million. Its net profit grew from $30.9 million to $53.9 million. WCC raised its revenues from $138 million in 1996 to $210 million in 1997. Unlike public correctional facilities, the vast profits of these private facilities rely on the employment of non-union labor.

The Prison Industrial Complex

But private prison companies are only the most visible component of the increasing corporatization of punishment. Government contracts to build prisons have bolstered the construction industry. The architectural community has identified prison design as a major new niche. Technology developed for the military by companies like Westinghouse is being marketed for use in law enforcement and punishment.

Moreover, corporations that appear to be far removed from the business of punishment are intimately involved in the expansion of the prison industrial complex. Prison construction bonds are one of the many sources of profitable investment for leading financiers such as Merrill Lynch. MCI charges prisoners and their families outrageous prices for the precious telephone calls which are often the only contact prisoners have with the free world.

Many corporations whose products we consume on a daily basis have learned that prison labor power can be as profitable as third world labor power exploited by U.S.-based global corporations. Both relegate formerly unionized workers to joblessness and many even wind up in prison. Some of the companies that use prison labor are IBM, Motorola, Compaq, Texas Instruments, Honeywell, Microsoft, and Boeing. But it is not only the hi-tech industries that reap the profits of prison labor. Nordstrom department stores sell jeans that are marketed as “Prison Blues,” as well as t-shirts and jackets made in Oregon prisons. The advertising slogan for these clothes is “made on the inside to be worn on the outside.” Maryland prisoners inspect glass bottles and jars used by Revlon and Pierre Cardin, and schools throughout the world buy graduation caps and gowns made by South Carolina prisoners.

“For private business,” write Eve Goldberg and Linda Evans (a political prisoner inside the Federal Correctional Institution at Dublin, California) “prison labor is like a pot of gold. No strikes. No union organizing. No health benefits, unemployment insurance, or workers’ compensation to pay. No language barriers, as in foreign countries. New leviathan prisons are being built on thousands of eerie acres of factories inside the walls. Prisoners do data entry for Chevron, make telephone reservations for TWA, raise hogs, shovel manure, make circuit boards, limousines, waterbeds, and lingerie for Victoria’s Secret — all at a fraction of the cost of ‘free labor.’”

Devouring the Social Wealth

Although prison labor — which ultimately is compensated at a rate far below the minimum wage — is hugely profitable for the private companies that use it, the penal system as a whole does not produce wealth. It devours the social wealth that could be used to subsidize housing for the homeless, to ameliorate public education for poor and racially marginalized communities, to open free drug rehabilitation programs for people who wish to kick their habits, to create a national health care system, to expand programs to combat HIV, to eradicate domestic abuse — and, in the process, to create well-paying jobs for the unemployed.

Since 1984 more than twenty new prisons have opened in California, while only one new campus was added to the California State University system and none to the University of California system. In 1996-97, higher education received only 8.7 percent of the State’s General Fund while corrections received 9.6 percent. Now that affirmative action has been declared illegal in California, it is obvious that education is increasingly reserved for certain people, while prisons are reserved for others. Five times as many black men are presently in prison as in four-year colleges and universities. This new segregation has dangerous implications for the entire country.

By segregating people labeled as criminals, prison simultaneously fortifies and conceals the structural racism of the U.S. economy. Claims of low unemployment rates — even in black communities — make sense only if one assumes that the vast numbers of people in prison have really disappeared and thus have no legitimate claims to jobs. The numbers of black and Latino men currently incarcerated amount to two percent of the male labor force. According to criminologist David Downes, “[t]reating incarceration as a type of hidden unemployment may raise the jobless rate for men by about one-third, to 8 percent. The effect on the black labor force is greater still, raising the [black] male unemployment rate from 11 percent to 19 percent.”

Hidden Agenda

Mass incarceration is not a solution to unemployment, nor is it a solution to the vast array of social problems that are hidden away in a rapidly growing network of prisons and jails. However, the great majority of people have been tricked into believing in the efficacy of imprisonment, even though the historical record clearly demonstrates that prisons do not work. Racism has undermined our ability to create a popular critical discourse to contest the ideological trickery that posits imprisonment as key to public safety. The focus of state policy is rapidly shifting from social welfare to social control.

Black, Latino, Native American, and many Asian youth are portrayed as the purveyors of violence, traffickers of drugs, and as envious of commodities that they have no right to possess. Young black and Latina women are represented as sexually promiscuous and as indiscriminately propagating babies and poverty. Criminality and deviance are racialized. Surveillance is thus focused on communities of color, immigrants, the unemployed, the undereducated, the homeless, and in general on those who have a diminishing claim to social resources. Their claim to social resources continues to diminish in large part because law enforcement and penal measures increasingly devour these resources. The prison industrial complex has thus created a vicious cycle of punishment which only further impoverishes those whose impoverishment is supposedly “solved” by imprisonment.

Therefore, as the emphasis of government policy shifts from social welfare to crime control, racism sinks more deeply into the economic and ideological structures of U.S. society. Meanwhile, conservative crusaders against affirmative action and bilingual education proclaim the end of racism, while their opponents suggest that racism’s remnants can be dispelled through dialogue and conversation. But conversations about “race relations” will hardly dismantle a prison industrial complex that thrives on and nourishes the racism hidden within the deep structures of our society.

The emergence of a U.S. prison industrial complex within a context of cascading conservatism marks a new historical moment, whose dangers are unprecedented. But so are its opportunities. Considering the impressive number of grassroots projects that continue to resist the expansion of the punishment industry, it ought to be possible to bring these efforts together to create radical and nationally visible movements that can legitimize anti-capitalist critiques of the prison industrial complex. It ought to be possible to build movements in defense of prisoners’ human rights and movements that persuasively argue that what we need is not new prisons, but new health care, housing, education, drug programs, jobs, and education. To safeguard a democratic future, it is possible and necessary to weave together the many and increasing strands of resistance to the prison industrial complex into a powerful movement for social transformation. 

Angela Davis is a former political prisoner, long-time activist, educator, and author who has devoted her life to struggles for social justice

(via pieceinthepuzzlehumanity-deacti)

Filed under business profit cattle soul prison incarceration color

0 notes

Homeland Security Issuing Its Own DMCA Takedowns On YouTube To Stifle Speech

DMCA: Digital Millennium Copyright Act

Mike Masnick of TechDirt, who received and published a DHS seizure affidavit, had this to say in a must-read article: …the affidavit itself is chock full of legal and technical errors, compounded by assertions-as-facts that seem to have little basis in reality. This is immensely troubling, especially given that the specific legal issues here are hardly settled law, and Homeland Security seems to be acting as if these cases are no brainers, allowing them to flat out seize domains, even when those websites have been declared perfectly legal in their home countries. The biggest problem is that Homeland Security seems to suggest — without a hint of doubt — that merely linking to infringing content is criminal copyright infringement. That is a huge stretch. The affidavit appears to make it clear that it believes that these sites are guilty of direct criminal copyright infringement, rather than any sort of contributory copyright infringement.As we’ve discussed in the past, the courts have tended to say that embedding and linking can be contributory infringement, but not direct infringement. Homeland Security and ICE may be in for a bit of legal trouble trying to prove that embedding is direct infringement.

Homeland Gestapo: Protecting the greedy bastards and fucking free speech.

Filed under dhs dmca siezure embed link internet legal profit state terror